Monthly Archives: September 2010

Martin on Matthew: Jesus, the Suffering Messiah

Background: Psalms of Solomon Eighteen hymns called the Psalms of Solomon were written around 50 BC, probably in Jerusalem. While not part of Scripture, they shed light on the messianic expectations of some Jews around the time of Jesus. One psalm speaks of a messiah who will deliver Jews from Roman rule and lead them into holiness: “See, Lord, and raise up for them their king, the son of David, to rule over your servant Israel in the time you have chosen, O God. Gird him with strength to shatter unrighteous rulers, to cleanse Jerusalem from gentiles who trample and destroy it. . . . to destroy their sinful pride like a clay pot, to smash their plan with an iron rod . . . He will have gentile nations serving under his yoke . . . and he will cleanse Jerusalem and make it holy as it was in the beginning. . . . For all shall be holy, and their king shall be the Lord Messiah. He will not trust in horse and rider and bow; he will not multiply gold and silver for war. . . . He himself will be free from sin so as to rule over a great people. He will put officials to shame and drive out sinners by the strength of a word. And he will not weaken during his days, because of his God, for God has made him powerful with a holy spirit. . . . This is the majesty of the king of Israel, whom God knew, to raise him over the house of Israel” (PsSol 17:21–24, 30, 32–33, 36–37, 42). The “Lord Messiah” of this psalm, while sinless, is a human being, and his rule takes place on this earth. Continue reading

Posted in Lectio divina, The Bible in the Church: The Ongoing Dialogue, The Biblical Renewal in the Church | 1 Comment

Emilie the Editor Post: The Inside Story

I work with gifted and talented people in a company that will celebrate in 2011, 100 years of serving the Catholic community. I am humbled and honored to do work that helps people to grow in knowledge and love of the Lord and to find healing and hope in the books that I have helped to bring about. The messages are there–“seek and you will find.”
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Posted in Signs of the Times, The Bible in the Church: The Ongoing Dialogue, The Biblical Renewal in the Church | 1 Comment

Mother Benedict, another saint

As Bosco vividly recounts the legacy of service that is Mother Benedict, the reader wonders how the story will end. As the saga draws to a close on pages 368 – 371, there is a heightened sense of gladness and enlightenment that does not disappoint. Like Mother Benedict’s life, the book ends with uncommon grace, honesty and insight that lingers in the reader’s mind—a secret gift of words that like any good ending, should not be disclosed ahead of time. Anyone who reads this book will be blessed, inspired and affirmed. Continue reading

Posted in Dialogue: The Divine and Human Dynamic of Modern Life, Lectio on Love: Theology of the Body, Men and Women in Dialogue, Signs of the Times | Leave a comment

Review of Schultz’ New Book on Lectio Divina and Sexuality

What exactly is Lectio Divina? As Schultz teaches, it is “a traditional Latin term for a holistic process of prayerfully reading and responding to God’s word. Its five stages: reading/listening, meditation, prayer, contemplation and action…” He also states that there is a learning curve to finding a personal rhythm with lectio and that the perspective of the “little way” spirituality of St. Therese Lisieux is especially useful. He writes that the Spirit directs the process and that “Lectio is meant to be a periodic Sabbath moment bridged to our activities and daily life through application of the ‘word’ we have received. View lectio as a retreat…a time to be refreshed and renewed by God’s word.” Continue reading

Posted in Dialogue: The Divine and Human Dynamic of Modern Life, Lectio divina, Lectio on Love: Theology of the Body, Men and Women in Dialogue, Pope Paul VI: The Art and Artist of Dialogue, Signs of the Times, The Bible in the Church: The Ongoing Dialogue, The Biblical Renewal in the Church | 1 Comment

The Circle of Life

All three friends, at the zenith of their wisdom and passion, collaborated to bring to life a book t hat is nothing short of spiritually spectacular. Continue reading

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Intimate Healing

How does this woman even get up in the morning, we ask. She writes, “There never was a guarantee that we, though baptized in the love of the Lord Jesus Christ, would be spared searing pain in our lives. On the contrary, sometimes I have suspected that we are the new “chosen ones,” selected to live as our founder did, faithful to the death.” Bosco draws the reader intimately in, explaining,” As for how—by giving us the most amazing, endurable miracle imaginable: Food, his own body and blood, to keep us alive forever.” Continue reading

Posted in Dialogue: The Divine and Human Dynamic of Modern Life, Lectio on Love: Theology of the Body, Men and Women in Dialogue, Signs of the Times | Leave a comment

Radical Forgiveness

What if you lost a beloved son to suicide and several years after that, another son and his wife were murdered? This happened to award winning journalist Antoinette Bosco—and her whole perception of forgiveness underwent a radical transformation at the deepest levels. Bosco explains that while most of us will never have to deal with forgiving someone who murdered a loved one, we all have people who have wounded us in some way. Continue reading

Posted in Dialogue: The Divine and Human Dynamic of Modern Life, Lectio on Love: Theology of the Body, Men and Women in Dialogue, Signs of the Times | Leave a comment